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anachronistic
13-06-08, 09:15 AM
Sometimes I don't always get paid by the hour. But for my current job, I am getting paid $12.50 an hour. That's a big step for someone who was just working minimum wage, just a year ago.

That's about $3000 a month. Unfortunately, I will only be working for a month, unless it turns into a summer job. That would be nice, but I can't really depend on it. I am actively searching out for my next job.

I am beginning to learn how to manage my money, now that I have future plans set out. I can't just go out and buy things that I want... the other day I was going to buy a leather jacket, but I declined, thinking I need to save up for more important things.

I will probably be getting a more hands-on job, that I have little to no experience in. It's going to be hard to get a job here, mid-summer, especially one that will pay decent. I will probably get stuck with a shitty minimum wage job.

With these freelance web design jobs, it is easy for me to set out a price; I know what I am doing; I have certification for what I am doing, and I have done it for more than 2 years. I could probably charge more if I wanted to, haha... but I need to find another job, and it will probably a learning experience for me.

Just wondering if you have any tips for little old me. Words of wisdom. Maybe about starting wage, and things like that. :)

vashti
13-06-08, 09:41 AM
Never ask for a lower salary than the previous job paid you for similar work (unless there is a national recession, or you were being ridiculously overpaid).

IndiReloaded
13-06-08, 10:06 AM
In your early working career you need to be realistic about your ability to command wages.

Unless you are in a job that requires specific training (which you have), be prepared to work for around minimum wage (or slightly better--its hard for companies to fill those spots with good ppl).

If you DO have training, then do ask for more money. Ask for what you are worth. Esp if you know you can get it elsewhere. But again, be realistic about what to expect. Check what others w/your experience are making in your area. And if you set your demands too high in an area with lots to choose from, be prepared for them to show you the door. From the company perspective, job interviews are about a lot more than deciding a persons wage level.

Students generally take lower paying jobs to get experience. If this is your case, make the most of it by doing a stellar job so you can get a good recommendation. Don't ever leave a job without one. In todays job market, a resume that shows some 'stick-to-it-ness' & good performance has as much (or more) impact than a perfect grade point average & lots of technical skills. In fact, a lot of new grads like that are pains in the ass b/c they come in w/unrealistic expectations.

The other advice about spending is more related to personality. Some ppl seem to be 'savers' & others 'spenders'. When we were students, we studied all year & took 4 month summer jobs that basically created the income we survived off of for the year. Man, we were living on a bare $5000/year each in those days, lol. We didn't own a car until my son was on the way. Everything we made in our student days, beyond basic living expenses (cheap!) went towards purchasing a car & a house. We even started investing back then (which we could then 'borrow' from to buy our house).

Anyway, that's how we did it. We're pretty comfortable now, so hope that helps.

Tone
13-06-08, 10:46 AM
I think you're very smart to understand the importance of good saving habits at this young age.

anachronistic
13-06-08, 05:25 PM
In your early working career you need to be realistic about your ability to command wages.

Unless you are in a job that requires specific training (which you have), be prepared to work for around minimum wage (or slightly better--its hard for companies to fill those spots with good ppl).

If you DO have training, then do ask for more money. Ask for what you are worth. Esp if you know you can get it elsewhere. But again, be realistic about what to expect. Check what others w/your experience are making in your area. And if you set your demands too high in an area with lots to choose from, be prepared for them to show you the door. From the company perspective, job interviews are about a lot more than deciding a persons wage level.

Students generally take lower paying jobs to get experience. If this is your case, make the most of it by doing a stellar job so you can get a good recommendation. Don't ever leave a job without one. In todays job market, a resume that shows some 'stick-to-it-ness' & good performance has as much (or more) impact than a perfect grade point average & lots of technical skills. In fact, a lot of new grads like that are pains in the ass b/c they come in w/unrealistic expectations.

The other advice about spending is more related to personality. Some ppl seem to be 'savers' & others 'spenders'. When we were students, we studied all year & took 4 month summer jobs that basically created the income we survived off of for the year. Man, we were living on a bare $5000/year each in those days, lol. We didn't own a car until my son was on the way. Everything we made in our student days, beyond basic living expenses (cheap!) went towards purchasing a car & a house. We even started investing back then (which we could then 'borrow' from to buy our house).

Anyway, that's how we did it. We're pretty comfortable now, so hope that helps.

After tuition and everything, I have about $2000 to live on for the year, haha... I do have my own car, which I purchased and take care of.


I have all kinds of experience, but not really in the area I see myself in. I think independent research will be in my favor. I plan to do a lot of that, especially when I am in Germany with all those libraries.

For my trip to Germany, I have to start planning out expenses. Tuition and everything is already covered, and I will have approximately $3000 plus whatever is left over from the summer to fund me. Do you think that's enough to get by in Germany and go traveling around?

Lipp
13-06-08, 06:28 PM
Got most living expenses and half the tuition fee covered by a maxed out swedish student loan, so next year I'll pick up a part-time job to cover the other half of the tuition fee (approx $5000 per half-year). Should be fine, just hope I find something relevant to my profession to stick with for a long time than winding up flipping burgers (or the equivalent here, being a Subway "Sandwich Artist").

What to work as though, hmm...Got to pull together my CV.

boobaa
13-06-08, 09:49 PM
$2000 isn't enough to live for about a year. Also, food is more expensive in Europe. Plus, there is rent, which takes half of this away, if not more.

As for career and wages, I see that most people have got it rather easy. It amazes me.

IndiReloaded
14-06-08, 01:42 AM
$2000 isn't enough to live for about a year. Also, food is more expensive in Europe. Plus, there is rent, which takes half of this away, if not more.

Ya, Urp is more expensive than here. Look into student rail passes & hostels.

Does your visa or passport situation allow you to work in Germany. I know with the EU, a lot of students can now work b/c they are eligible for citizenship. My son is eligible for EU b/c his father is a Brit, for example. Look into that also.

anachronistic
14-06-08, 02:15 AM
I will only be there from April through August... and like I said that will be how much money I have after tuition and rent and stuff...

IndiReloaded
14-06-08, 03:57 AM
If that's after living expenses, then yes I should think that would do if you're frugal. That's about $600 per month.

I'm assuming you don't need to pay for airfare from that.

Make a monthly budget for yourself so you don't blow it all in the first month. If you have left over near the end, put it towards something you didn't think you'd be able to afford.

Junket
14-06-08, 04:33 AM
600 per month??

Did you already consider what it will cost to pay for your phone bill and car insurance, things like that?

Gribble
14-06-08, 04:58 AM
Did you factor in Uncle Sam's cut?

GrkScorp
14-06-08, 08:38 PM
Just wondering if you have any tips for little old me. Words of wisdom. Maybe about starting wage, and things like that. :)

http://i306.photobucket.com/albums/nn250/SummaFelix/con_47.jpg

The obvious:

Don't settle for less that you're worth.., but be honest with yourself and know roughly how much you're worth realistically.., and when someone is offering it to you.., take it or negotiate.., never walk out.., it's better they reject you.., than you settle for less..

Also:

Don't let a lower salary bother you that much for the moment.., what's the difference? what's the impact on the long-term? Not much.., don't lose track of your real goals.., your long-term goals.., this is just "spending money".., to get by and save up for hard times or switching between jobs.., the real choice starts when you're finally ready to start working in a steady job that you plan to be working in for a while..

Best,

GrkScorp

clearskies
14-06-08, 10:45 PM
Let's talk about Spending habits, you have money and a lot of money but you just waste it here and there .. how to stop buying useless things to save money?

clearskies
14-06-08, 10:48 PM
and what if you said 'Ok that is my what i am supposed to be paid per hour' , you might stay at home for a long time if you did not find such employer who evaluates your work the way you see it.

Tedel
16-06-08, 10:36 PM
Damn, 3000 a month would make me rich here. Maybe we should do an agreement: you outsource with me and you keep a percentage.

boobaa
16-06-08, 11:39 PM
Difficulties with saving up? The first thing you want to do is have a thing you need to save up for. When that is established, its easy, you just don't buy things you don't really need. If you can't do that, well then you are crazy.

clearskies
17-06-08, 06:08 AM
If you put yourself in the position of a traveller or a temporary resident, that will do you fine in savings.. this means you are living here today and tomorrow you might not be here. If you would calculate the amount of crap you have to move with you, you will be in serious trouble. So it was better to minimise your purchases to an economic level.